The Emotional Price of Making Video Games

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CDNAdmin
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The Emotional Price of Making Video Games

Postby CDNAdmin » Tue Feb 26, 2013 11:46 am

GameSpot has a good article up about the trials and tribulations of game development and how it affects all those involved.

"The emotional journey, for me, looks like a seismograph," says Greg Kasavin of Supergiant Games. Before the success of his game Bastion, on which he was creative director, Kasavin was an associate producer at Electronic Arts on Command & Conquer 3, the producer of Command & Conquer: Red Alert 3, and later a producer on Spec Ops: The Line at 2K Games. "It's not a curve with peaks and valleys; it's a violent jagged series of near-vertical lines. I don't know how emotionally stable I appear to be, but I know I'm less so than I appear to be. My emotional state changes from day to day, if not multiple times a day. I don't have sustained periods of high or low morale. Small imperceptible things affect me in significant ways."

"In every case the precise emotional journey is different," explains Zeschuk, "though there are a few similarities. When you start a game, it seems like anything is possible; the future is bright and the possibilities are limitless. Fast-forward to the actual production phase, and you suddenly realize that if you want to finish on a reasonable schedule, you need to jettison some stuff; it's helpful to be harsh and cold to do this, even if it's painful. Then, when you're finishing, even if you think what you're making is great, I always felt a bit of trepidation around what people would think of the game. You never really know. We'd always try our best, and put forward our best work, but there's always that risk that folks wouldn't like it. The most likely outcome is that you'd end up with some mixed response, though with varying degrees of happy and unhappy people."


Read the full article here.
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launcher
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Re: The Emotional Price of Making Video Games

Postby launcher » Tue Feb 26, 2013 4:57 pm

:lol: he killed the command and conquere franchise... he made a high budget game, mostly forgotten, at the time the other developers came out with halo, portal and games that have more sequals and are thriving. so this is the guy to blame for the garbage that came out.

tiberium wars i had the misfortune to play, it had smaller maps, less troop options. basically tried hypnotising people with graphics, to cover for bad and lacking content. i litterally played that game only 5 times... generals. redalert 2 and tiberium sun... i pretty much melted them copies playing it hundreds of times... tiberium wars was obnoxious they created floating battleships the other sides couldnt counter. a litteral i win button.

now i seen the red alert 3 previews, but after playing tiberium wars and seeing what they did to C&C i wouldnt hand them 50 dollars and say lets see how dissapointing you can make a game that once was good. the command and conquere franchise is toasted, in large part due to this guy. seriously if he makes another command and conquere game it would save everyone time if he put a logo of command and conqure on a cup, sealed inside it is raw sewerage. because thats what your putting in your computer.

maybe the stress was to high on him taking a well established thriving franchise. they had counterstrike, redalert 2, dune, westwood studios was building up faster, diversifying. they hand it to electronic arts and they flushed it all down the toilet.

he took a working formula and dumbed it down seeking a bigger audience, that audience never came and lost the one he had. :lol: seriously i loved west wood games and played hundreds and probably thousands of hours on them, and he messed it all up. so not going easy on this guy. he took the best strategy franchise and tried turning it into something like leapfrog or a toddler game. i see him as a failed game developer, that better not make a game for black isle studios, and rather he should go ruin some other franchises that i dont play.
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CDNAdmin
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Re: The Emotional Price of Making Video Games

Postby CDNAdmin » Thu Feb 28, 2013 11:52 am

Some great insight from a series of professionals in the industry; dealing with post release depression, internal politics, crunch, etc.
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ArchAngel
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Re: The Emotional Price of Making Video Games

Postby ArchAngel » Thu Feb 28, 2013 3:33 pm

It was, thanks for the share.

"Indie Game: the Movie" was a really good luck on that side of game development, following the guys who made Super Meat Boy, Fez, and Braid. I recommended to anyone who hasn't seen it yet.
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Re: The Emotional Price of Making Video Games

Postby brandav » Tue Mar 12, 2013 8:46 pm

Yea, Indie game the movie was very important to show what it really means to be an indie game developer. "Going indie" has really been trending, because people want to have the freedom to make the games they want to play. But the movie showed that it's not all rainbows and blue skies. A lot of emotional turmoil and stress overload was seen in all of the main characters. It sounds like Kasavin and Zeschuk know exactly how these developers felt.

One of the developers, Edmund McMillen, said he was poor for ten years making 37 games before his success with meat boy came. I'd say that his situation is more the rule than the exception. Who's up for 10 years of poverty? The reality is harsh.


When you start a game, it seems like anything is possible; the future is bright and the possibilities are limitless.


Many aspiring game developers, indie or not, are stuck in this pre-development "the world is within my grasp" mode. Although these dreams are important, the struggles of real game development can't be forgotten. We have to remember this before we bet our careers and our lives on that one great idea. Movies and articles like these need to continue being made to keep us all grounded.

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